ORIE 4154 - Revenue Optimization and Marketplace Design



Course Description

This course aims to expose students to modeling and optimization techniques which can be used to design the firm-market interface. In particular, this interface can take two forms:

  • Demand management: How to sell the right product to the right customer at the right time for the right price.
  • Marketplace design: Determining who gets what and why (and at what price) in two-sided platform marketplaces.

We will draw on a rich body of research spanning three disciplines - operations management, economics and computer science - and study a collection of related (yet diverse) mathematical models and techniques. The models we cover have proved successful in practice across various industries; however, given the transformations brought about by the advent of online commerce and increased use of smartphones, our aim is to provide students with tools that generalize to new domains.

Course Information

  • Syllabus: pdf
  • Lectures: TR 11.40pm-12.55pm, Thurston 205, Map
  • Prelim: 28th March 2017, 7.30pm - 9.30pm, Kimball B11, Map
  • Instructor: Siddhartha Banerjee, 229 Rhodes Hall, email
  • Teaching Assistants:

Assignments

Lectures

References

There is no required textbook for the course; we will cover materials from a variety of sources, and relevant notes and references will be uploaded here and on Piazza. That said, for interested students, here are some recommended books.

  • The following textbooks are a great resource for students interested in reading more about the history, organizing principles, and applications of pricing and revenue management:
    • Pricing and Revenue Optimization by Robert Phillips: This gives an excellent overview of the operational viewpoint of revenue management, though from a less technical perspective than what we will cover.
      (The Cornell library gives you access to an online version)
    • Principles of Pricing by Vohra and Krishnamurthi: This looks at pricing from an economics and marketing perspectives. Excellent for background reading, but again, at a less technical level than what we will cover.
  • An excellent, though somewhat technical book for the main revenue management results which we will cover in class is:
  • For the market design segment, the following two books are excellent references (and available online!).

The course will draw extensively on earlier versions of this course taught by Huseyin Topaloglu and Paat Rusmevicheintong; some material related these courses may be uploaded on Blackboard as the semester progresses.